• Ryan Himes

OPINION: Why Don't We Try Something New?

Updated: Oct 16, 2020

This country was founded 244 years ago, and it doesn't appear that our methods for problem solving are working very well. Among other things, the idea of a Filibuster or a Government Shutdown is remarkable in a vacuum, meaning it's a little absurd that grown men and women can essentially throw a temper tantrum because they can't get along. Or that a lawmaker at the highest level can read a children's book on the Congress floor to intentionally waste everyone's time.


This grievance extends far past the seemingly petulant children we let represent the country, I'd actually like to take a minute to question the system itself, and all of its institutions. Without analyzing anything in particular, can anyone say that the way we live today is good? Or is it just "good enough"?


We should be open to a change when things aren't working as well as they should be. Even if the answer to the problem isn't immediately obvious, especially then, we shouldn't stop looking. Imagine looking for your car keys for a total of 2 minutes, and then deciding you're comfortable walking everywhere for the rest of your life. Our government, the system of a two house republic as it stands in the United States, is innately flawed and we should question whether it can be done better.


I'd like to say that I'm not suggesting that we rewrite the Constitution, but that's exactly what I'm suggesting. I'd like us to at least ask the question: is this government working? Think of how long it takes for us to see governmental action on issues we care about. We desperately want to point fingers at each other, because without someone to point at, there is nowhere else to look. Yet the system itself is flawed, and maybe the world changed enough over the past 244 years for us to need a new foundation.


And when you ask yourself "well what would you do to make it work better?" and you can't think of anything, remember that the Constitutional Convention, the meeting that founded our current government, had 55 brilliant minds working in tandem to build the system we live in. The next government will likely need a similar convention, and our nation's greatest minds will need to build an equally impressive structure. I have nothing but faith in our ability to do so. I am concerned only with our ability to question the way we live. Are we sure that this is the best we can do?